What is Brutus thinking about in the soliloquy in Scene I of Act II?

What is Brutus thinking about in the soliloquy in Scene I of Act II?

In a soliloquy, Brutus considers the possibilities. He has no personal feelings against Caesar, yet he must consider the good of Rome. Caesar has not yet acted irresponsibly, but once he is crowned and has power, he could change and do harm to Rome.

What is the purpose of Cassius monologue after Brutus exits Act 1 Scene 2?

Cassius’ soliloquy is an important aspect of this scene. A soliloquy, a speech made by a character who is alone on the stage, reveals the character’s true nature, thoughts, and feelings. In his soliloquy, after Casca and Brutus exit, Cassius indicates how he plans to trick Brutus into the plot against Caesar.

What is Brutus’s purpose in delivering this monologue?

Brutus’ speech would give the impression that the conspiracy was all his idea and that he was solely responsible. He thinks that his sterling reputation will justify the assassination. He asks the plebeians to take his word for the need to eliminate Julius Caesar.

How does Brutus establish his credibility?

o Brutus establishes his credibility as a speaker. He first reminds the audience of his reputation as a man of honor as evidence that he can be trusted, saying, “Believe me / for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor / that you may believe” (lines 15–17).

Who is Brutus talking to in his soliloquy?

He provides his own garden as the conspirators’ meeting place and convinces the gathered men not to take an oath, though Cassius would prefer that they do so. Brutus is the one who sends Decius to speak to Caesar at the end of the scene, and it is he who speaks the final words to the conspirators as they depart.

What is Shakespeare’s purpose in having Brutus speak his soliloquy?

The purpose of a soliloquy is usually to display the inner conflict of a character debating with himself. In Brutus’s case, this conflict is so thoroughly resolved that, while at the beginning of act 2, scene 1, he is unsure of whether to join the conspiracy, by the end of the scene, he is effectively leading it.

What was Cassius tone during his conversation with Brutus?

Choose the following words that best describe Cassius’ tone in his conversation with Brutus: Cassius’ tone in his conversation with Brutus is loving and cunning. His tone was designed to make Brutus feel that he is just as good or even better than Caesar.

What is Brutus thinking about during his opening soliloquy?

what is the purpose of Brutus’ soliloquy at the beginning of Act 2? He goes back and forth with himself- he wants there to be another solution other than killing Caesar, but he can’t find one. He ends up deciding that the best thing for the country is to kill him.

What is the circular reasoning that Brutus uses in his monologue in which he decides to take part in Caesar’s assassination?

Brutus is thinking that Caesar is only pretending to be humble and modest in order to make an impression on the masses.

Is it possible for Caesar to be swayed by power?

Although he admits that he has never seen Caesar swayed by power in the past, he believes that it would be impossible for Caesar to reach such heights without eventually coming to scorn those lower in status.

Who was sent to speak to Caesar at the end?

Brutus is the one who sends Decius to speak to Caesar at the end of the scene, and it is he who speaks the final words to the conspirators as they depart. So, too, does Brutus overrule Cassius when he suggests that they assassinate Antony along with Caesar.

How did Cassius convince Caesar to go to the Capitol?

Cassius states that no one knows whether Caesar will come to the Capitol that day, since the warnings of augurs (seers or soothsayers) after this brutal evening might keep him at home. But Decius assures the others that he will be able to convince Caesar to ignore his superstitions by flattering his bravery.